Luke Parry

‘I am driven by my belief that there should be absolutely no gender equality gap, which is why I’m helping to create a better working world for my daughter.’

Luke Parry

Job title: Employer Brand Manager, People - Recruitment UK & Ireland (London)

Time at EY: 9 months

I joined EY as Employer Brand Manager in May 2015, having worked in PR, employer branding and recruitment for global IT, FMCG and FS companies, as well as a six-year stint in the armed forces. I am driven by my belief that there should be absolutely no gender equality gap, which is why I’m helping to create a better working world for my daughter.

Luke on... a study predicting it will be 117 years until gender equality is achieved

“Wow. That’s a long time, it’s absolutely absurd it should be that long. It makes you think, ‘Where is it going that wrong that it’s my daughter’s, daughter’s, daughter’s, daughter who will be the first one to go into the workplace equal?’”

Luke on... changing mindsets within the workplace

“People are becoming more aware of being time rich [rather than financially rich] and having flexibility, which I think can be a really good driver for equality. It’s changing from the mindset of the 70-hours-a-week, lunch-is-for-wimps, driven alpha-male type you would get in the financial services or professional services world. I definitely experienced it when I was in advertising.”

Luke on... research showing 80% of men, but only 40% of women, feel they have equality

“Figures like that are an eye opener. It makes you want to be a champion for equality and push that agenda, because it’s so important for both sexes to feel valued, to feel that there is not a massive gap.”

Luke on... who should be fixing inequality

“You can’t change this particular problem with just one sex. You have to have both brains working together.”

Luke on... attitudes to taking paternity leave after his daughter was born

“I wish I’d had Tilly when I was at EY. Where I was working at the time it was a very different atmosphere. Because I was male, it was perceived that two weeks was more than enough - it was basically free holiday - and I should get back in the office and make some money.”

Luke on... the idea of shared parental leave

“I would have loved to spend more time with my daughter in her first year with a shared paternity/maternity leave scheme. It’s a negative of gender inequality from a male point of view that my previous employer very much said, ‘we don’t have to give this to you’. I got two weeks because I negotiated it before I joined but it would have been lovely to get more.”

Luke was interviewed alongside Mollie Brodie for our Creating Equality Together video.

Creating Equality Together

Find out more of what we're doing to create equality