Rachel's Story

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Rachel Dyges
  • Rachel Dyges

Rachel worked in business continuity for a number of major banks in the UK before joining EY. She carries out audit and implementation work in IT disaster recovery, business continuity and crisis management for our clients across various sectors.

1. Tell us about your career journey

I worked in business continuity for various banks from RBS, BNP Paribas to Kleinwort Benson. I joined EY in July 2018 to build on my technical skills as well as work across a wider range of business sectors by being part of their wider cybersecurity and resilience team.

 

 2. What is the biggest misconception about working in Cybersecurity & Resilience?

That it is all technical. Resilience is about being able to protect, react, respond and recover. It is the planning side of things in terms of what the key processes are, how these are affected in a crisis, and what you need to do to resume your business operations. Not all aspects of resilience require specific technical skills but the experience of managing or working within a programme is valuable. Meanwhile, cybersecurity looks at the security architecture and the more technical elements of testing the security systems. In my role, I work closely with the cybersecurity teams and I’m able to tap into their wider technical expertise.

 

3. What advice would you give to anyone wanting to pursue or continue a career in Cybersecurity & Resilience?

It is one of the fastest growing areas with large-scale security and data breaches in the news almost every week. You have a guaranteed and in-demand skill. However, you need to be clear about what area you wish to work in as it is quite varied. Do you want to work on the resilience and business continuity side looking at impact analysis and recovery, or do you want to be involved in cybersecurity managing data integrity, doing system testing or ethical hacking? It is a lot broader than people think so you have to hone in on your interests and skills.

 

4. What projects are you working on?

I have just finished working on an IT disaster recovery audit for a client. The client went through a merger and were moving onto a new platform. It involved us reviewing the current and future state of their IT disaster recovery. As part of the merger, the client was moving some of their applications to the cloud so we also addressed the possible impacts to their new business model and IT landscape.

 

 5. Finally, what are some key trends you are seeing at the moment?

With the rise of sophisticated cyber-attacks, our clients want the reassurance that they can recover quickly from a crisis. A recent EY survey showed that clients are spending more on cybersecurity, meaning they need more of the right people and skills to help them fight off against security and data threats.

Another trend I’m seeing with our clients, is the move to cloud-based solutions. Amongst our surveyed clients, this is the largest area where they are prioritising their investments. Therefore, having the right security, strategy and recovery programmes becomes increasingly important to protect their technology and IT investments as well as their key business processes. 

Rachel Dyges
  • Rachel Dyges

About the author

Rachel is a Cyber Resilience Manager in UK & Ireland. Rachel worked in business continuity for a number of major banks in the UK before joining EY. She carries out audit and implementation work in IT disaster recovery, business continuity and crisis management for our clients across various sectors.